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Turing Test

The "standard interpretation" of the Turing Test, in which player C, the interrogator, is tasked with trying to determine which player – A or B – is a computer and which is a human. The interrogator is limited to using the responses to written questions to make the determination. Image adapted from Saygin, 2000.


The Turing test is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. In the original illustrative example, a human judge engages in natural language conversations with a human and a machine designed to generate performance indistinguishable from that of a human being. All participants are separated from one another. If the judge cannot reliably tell the machine from the human, the machine is said to have passed the test. The test does not check the ability to give the correct answer to questions; it checks how closely the answer resembles typical human answers. The conversation is limited to a text-only channel such as a computer keyboard and screen so that the result is not dependent on the machine's ability to render words into audio.

The test was introduced by Alan Turing in his 1950 paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence," which opens with the words: "I propose to consider the question, 'Can machines think?'" Because "thinking" is difficult to define, Turing chooses to "replace the question by another, which is closely related to it and is expressed in relatively unambiguous words" Turing's new question is: "Are there imaginable digital computers which would do well in the imitation game?" This question, Turing believed, is one that can actually be answered. In the remainder of the paper, he argued against all the major objections to the proposition that "machines can think".

In the years since 1950, the test has proven to be both highly influential and widely criticised, and it is an essential concept in the philosophy of artificial intelligence

Turing Test in Thunder ForceEdit

Guardian's Heart

The Guardian proved to be the strongest of all AI's on Earth during the Turing Test.

Mentioned in Thunder Force V, the Turing Test is used to evaluate the strength of the Artificial Intelligence on Earth. During the test, the Guardian proved to be the strongest AI in the world by setting new records, one of them being the quickest solution of the Hawking's Paradox in a record time of  2 hours with 13 minutes, being seconded by REFFI's time of 5 hours with 28 minutes.

LinksEdit

Turing Test on Wikipedia.

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